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Family Violence Act Offenses
Family Violence Act Offenses

One area of the criminal justice system that can often be confusing is the offenses that are alleged under Georgia’s Family Violence Act. The intention behind this legislation is to help protect victims of domestic violence and punish perpetrators of acts of domestic violence. This is certainly a noble endeavor. However, Family Violence Act (“FVA”) laws, which are sometimes referred to as Domestic Violence (“DV”) laws are broad in their written scope, and in their sweep, and can have unforeseen and lasting impacts both inside and outside of the criminal court process. People are often unaware of these potential impacts.

 

Who can find out about your case, if dismissed?
Who can find out about your case, if dismissed?

When an adult (17 or older), who has been charged with a crime, has their case dismissed, one of the most common questions is: “who will know about this in the future?”  or “what kinds of records will exist about this?”

Answering Criminal History Related Questions for Job and College Applications
Answering Criminal History Related Questions for Job and College Applications

One issue that people who have experienced a run-in with the law tend to encounter is how to honestly answer a job or college application.  For the purposes of this article we are addressing run-ins with the law in Georgia after an individual turns 17 years old.

But I thought it was just a ticket!
But I thought it was just a ticket!

A common question that has come up recently is whether an offense is serious or not, when a person receives a ticket from the officer for the offense.  Historically, officers would routinely arrest individuals charged with misdemeanor offenses like underage possession of alcohol, possession of marijuana, possession of drug related objects, or shoplifting.

What every driver under 21 (and their parents) should know about Georgia traffic laws.
What every driver under 21 (and their parents) should know about Georgia traffic laws.

There is often a look of shock and surprise on an individual’s face when they find out that being convicted for a traffic offense they are charged with can lead to a suspension of their driver’s license. To know whether someone is likely to be at risk for a driver’s license suspension, there must be a determination of which one of three categories they are in.

What to expect when your juvenile teen gets charged with a crime
What to expect when your juvenile teen gets charged with a crime

In Georgia, a young person who is charged with most crimes is treated as a juvenile if they are 16 years old and younger.  These juvenile criminal cases are referred to as juvenile delinquency cases.   Juvenile delinquency cases can track many different ways through our judicial system, but this article should serve as a guide for the typical path of a juvenile delinquency case.

Removing Youthful Mistakes from a Georgia Criminal History
Removing Youthful Mistakes from a Georgia Criminal History

There has been recent media coverage regarding projects to prevent criminal histories from affecting employment opportunities for individuals.  This includes “Ban the Box” and other projects intended to help individuals who have a criminal history be able to get back in to the workforce and be productive members of society.

Can anyone find out about your case, if it is dismissed?
Can anyone find out about your case, if it is dismissed?

When an adult (17 or older), who has been charged with a crime, has their case dismissed, one of the most common questions is: “who will know about this in the future?”  or “what kinds of records will exist about this?”

Taking the Mystery Out of the Criminal Process
Taking the Mystery Out of the Criminal Process

While criminal cases can track many different ways through our judicial system, this article explains the typical path of a criminal case.

Frequently Asked Questions

What’s the difference between a police stop and being arrested?
Show AnswerGhanouni Teen & Young Adult Defense Firm

Police may stop and question you, although you have the right to refuse to answer. While a stop detains you for a short time, you are not moved to a different location as with an arrest. In order for police to make an arrest, they must have “probable cause,” which means there must be a reasonable belief a crime was committed and that you were involved in the crime. If the police arrest you, they take you in to custody and you may not leave.

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How we help You

We help to minimize the impact that the accusations against you have on your life by creating a customized plan that best serves you.

We do not offer one size fits criminal defense.

We help protect the futures of Georgia teens and young adults accused of crimes.